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Non Fiction

Confessions From Prison

Confessions From Prison is a compilation of prisoners’ stories, their crime and their experience, as well as some of their letters written from prison. One can never actually walk in another’s shoes, but Confessions From Prison humanizes the person without stereotype and gives us a sense of who these people really are.

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The Ronnie Lee and Jackie Bancroft Spencer Morgan Story, a tale of people, greed, envy, manipulation… even crime!

When Hugh Bancroft,Jr., family owner of The Wall Street Journal, died, he left his wife, Jackie Bancroft, one of the wealthiest women in America. After she built the Spencer Theater in Ruidoso, New Mexico, and paid twenty-three million in cash for it, she married her gay interior decorator, Ron Morgan, for the last fling of her life. Glen Aaron, author, was the lawyer for for Morgan and had been so for many years through multiple legal problems. As Aaron came to know Jackie, they became fast friends and she often used him as consigliore and to double check what her vast array of trust lawyers were telling her. On an extended world cruise, Jackie became suspiciously and seriously ill. It became Aaron's duty to retrieve her from the cruise trip in the middle of the southern Atlantic and get her to health care in the U.S., where she ultimately died. Her death precipitated numerous lawsuits from her heirs and Morgan, himself, who had manipulated a position of heirship. This five year intrigue ultimately led the author, Glen Aaron, to federal prison on a technicality, a path he would never have anticipated. That path evolved into The Prison Trilogy, and The Ronnie Lee and Jackie Bancroft Spencer Morgan Story is the beginning.
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The Colonel George Trofimoff Story, the tale of America’s highest- ranking military officer convicted of spying “In God We Trust,” one man’s search for everlasting life

In prison, the author was assigned Colonel George Trofimoff as his cellmate. The Colonel turned out to be the highest-ranking U.S. military officer ever convicted of spying. After initially resisting, Aaron, the author and a retired attorney, agreed to look at the Colonel's case with the hope of finding a reason to make an additional appeal. What Aaron found was a complete travesty of justice, an entrapment, although the American judiciary allowed it. For two years, an FBI agent had posed as a D.C. Russian Embassy representative in a sting operation designed to bribe and entrap the Colonel into exchanging what turned out to be a made-up story of espionage against America for the promise of a $45,000 payment by the "Russians." The resulting federal trial in Tampa railroaded the Colonel into a life prison sentence. This is the second book in The Prison Trilogy by the author and dynamically tells the story of Colonel George Trofimoff.
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Observer: The Prison People; The Prison Experience (The Prison Trilogy) (Volume 3)

In 2004, the author, Glen Aaron, was sentenced to two years in federal prison arising out of his attorney representation of a wealthy Wall Street Journal heiress and her husband. The Prison People; The Prison Experience takes you on an interesting to unique inmates met and what it is like to be incarcerated in America. It is not an "oh poor me" book. Fascinating characters and a look at America's criminal justice system brings both humor and serious introspection about how we go about legislating crime and the retribution we require as a society.
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In God We Trust? One Man’s Journey From Religion, to Reason

"In God We Trust" is one man's search for everlasting life beginning as prepubescent child when Glen's dog, Schatzie, his best friend, is killed. He begins asking for the first time, "Is there a heaven?" "Will I see Schatzie, again?" As the question continues, the quest becomes a comparative study of Abrahamic religions and what each has to offer on the subject of life after death.
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Was America founded on Christian principles?

Do you know how we got the First Amendment? Do you know what Congress did with it? Do you know what the states did with it? Why did we need separation of church and state, anyway?
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